2021 Miami University Libraries Copyright Webinar Series

This free webinar series will help librarians, students, educators, and campus attorneys develop their knowledge of current copyright topics and issues! All webinars will feature auto-generated closed captioning. If you require additional accommodations please contact the series coordinator, Carla Myers, at myersc2@miamioh.edu at least two weeks prior to the webinar(s) you are interested in attending.

Copyright Boot Camp, Part I – Foundations
Presented by Carla Myers
Bulk up on copyright knowledge at copyright boot camp! This four-part webinar series will provide an overview of key components of U.S. copyright law that impact libraries and academia. In Part I we’ll explore how copyright is secured, types of works eligible for copyright protection, rights granted to creators, and the duration of copyright.
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Copyright Boot Camp, Part II – Fair Use
Presented by Carla Myers
This webinar will explore the fair use right found in Section 107 of U.S. copyright law. We’ll discuss the four factors of fair use and explore review tools and resources that can aid in making thoughtful fair use determinations.
Tuesday, August 3, 2021, 2:00pm-3:30pm ET

Copyright Boot Camp, Part III – Exceptions for Library Lending
Presented by Carla Myers
Sections 108 and 109 provide options for libraries to make print and digital copies of works available for patrons. Attend this session to learn more about how your library can take advantage of these user rights when looking to make services and resources available to users!
Thursday, August 5, 2021, 2:00pm-3:30pm ET

Copyright Boot Camp, Part IV – Exceptions for Instruction
Presented by Carla Myers
Alongside fair use, Sections 110(1) and 110(2) also provide rights for the reuse of copyrighted works as part of course instruction. In this session we’ll explore options for face-to-face instruction and the digital transmission of works as part of distance education.

The End of the GSU Copyright Lawsuit: What did 12 Years of Litigation Accomplish?
Presented by Laura Burtle
The Cambridge v. Becker (Patton/Albert) lawsuit, better known as the GSU copyright lawsuit or GSU e-reserves lawsuit, lasted 12 years and cost millions of dollars. The case was filed in 2008, with the first opinion coming in 2012, and resulted in two appellate court rulings and three district court opinions. What were the publishers seeking, and what did they accomplish? What did libraries learn? Where does fair use stand in the area of electronic reserves? Who won?
Thursday, August 12, 2021, 2:00pm-3:00pm ET
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Small Claims, Sovereign Immunity, and Safe Harbors
Presented by Jonathan Band
This session will look at key copyright policy issues in 2021, including how you can influence policymakers.

Thursday, August 19, 2021, 2:00pm-3:00pm ET
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What I Wish I had Know When I was Getting Started as a Copyright Librarian
Presented by Sandra Aya Enimil, Donna Ferullo, Emily Finch, Peter Jaszi, and Cindy Kristof
Join us as our panelists reflect on what information they wish they had known when they were first getting started in this field.
Thursday, August 26, 2021, 2:00pm-3:00pm ET
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My Favorite Copyright Case
Presented by Dwayne Butler, Will Cross, Pia Hunter, and Kevin Smith
In this webinar panelists will take you through notable copyright cases that they feel are especially impactful for the public.
Thursday, September 2, 2021, 2:00pm-3:00pm ET
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The Law and Accessible Texts: Reconciling Copyrights and Civil Rights
Presented by Brandon Butler

For years, libraries, disability services offices, and others involved in fulfilling the requirements of disability rights laws have viewed copyright as an impediment to their work. They have been uncertain about what is permitted, and have constrained their activities in support of civil rights out of fear of violating copyrights. In this session, I’ll describe how copyright law provides libraries, DSOs, and others with broad, clear authority to create accessible copies of in-copyright works, to distribute accessible texts to qualified users, and to retain and share remediated texts in secure repositories for use in serving future qualifying requests.
Thursday, September 9, 2021, 2pm-3pm ET
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The Fair Use Doctrine in the U.S. Copyright System
Presented by Stacey Lantagne
Fair use is the main copyright defense under United States law, but it’s a complicated and unpredictable doctrine unique to our First-Amendment-influenced world. This session will provide a brief history of the doctrine, an explanation of the policies it is trying to accomplish, and a demonstration of the four main fair use factors and how they can be applied to various scenarios.
Thursday, September 16, 2021, 2pm-3pm ET
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Teaching Visually: Copyright Tool Creation & Pedagogy
Presented by Brandy Karl and Gabe Galson
Teaching copyright isn’t just about lectures, lengthy text, or workshops. Visual designs that convey information about copyright are attention-grabbing and effective. We will discuss effective copyright teaching tools by examining existing resources that enable copyright novices to navigate legal logic and terminology. We’ll discuss the pedagogical benefits of presenting information visually, and the challenges raised by designing resources for copyright information literacy. As an exercise, participants will assess visual copyright tools currently in use. This session will function both as an exploration of the craft of creating pedagogical tools, as well as a way to learn how to assess potential projects.
Thursday, September 23, 2021, 2pm-3pm ET
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Creative Commons: Understanding, Applying, and Teaching
Presented by Raven Lanier
Creative Commons is an incredibly important tool when it comes to sharing and reusing the copyrighted works of others, but it can also be difficult to understand. This session will cover why Creative Commons licenses are important, how they work within copyright law, best practices for applying and using Creative Commons licensed works, and how we can encourage our university communities to become part of the Creative Commons movement.

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Copyright Imposter Syndrome: No JD? No Problem!
Presented by Emilie Algenio, Molly Keener, and Melanie Kowalski
Are you a new Copyright Librarian? Did copyright responsibilities recently fall into your lap? Are you feeling overwhelmed and underprepared? Fear not! This is the session for you. Join us for an unconference style session about fighting Copyright Imposter Syndrome (CIS) and gaining confidence around becoming a copyright expert. The session will be driven by questions and topics gathered directly from the audience. Participants will be empowered to take control of their copyright education, learn ways to increase your self-reliance and knowledge in providing copyright support, and also develop a growing network of fellow copyright experts for continued support and community.
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Practical Techniques for Copyright Instruction
Presented by Andrea Schuler
Effective copyright instruction can provide a foundation for undergraduate & graduate students in making informed decisions about their rights to their own work and in using and building upon the work of others. This presentation offers practical techniques for copyright instruction, including topics to target to various populations, partners for outreach & teaching, examples of teaching successes & lessons learned, and will take the audience through some activities used with students.
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Navigating the Land of Confusion: Getting Started with Music Copyright
Presented by Kathleen DeLaurenti and Nazareth Pantaloni
If rainy days and music copyright questions get you down, this session will teach you how to shake it off so that you’re walking on sunshine with every music question at your institution! Dealing with music copyright brings in complications that you don’t see when supporting faculty and students publishing monographs and articles. Mechanical licenses, master use licenses, and synchronization licenses paired with multiple copyrights in musical works quickly adds complexity to seemingly simple inquiries. This hands on workshop will help attendees understand the basics of music copyright, implications of the new Music Modernization Act, and what resources to keep handy when dealing with thorny music copyright issues.
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